Wholemeal scones

Yet another recipe I’m attempting because one of the key ingredients is something I have in the cupboard with ‘best before 2 months ago’ printed on the top of the pack, and further, as regular readers will know I love scones. (From The Reader’s Digest Cookery Year (1976), Basic Cooking Methods – Buns and Scones by Margaret Coombes and Suzanne Wakelin of the Good Housekeeping Institute.)

Notes

  • Add the milk little by little, mixing thoroughly, because I sloshed in the last few mils and the dough ended up very sticky and had to be mixed by hand in the bowl, rather than kneaded.
  • When I had wrestled it on to the baking tray and patted it into shaped (see above), I decided to sprinkle some oats on top for extra rustic fanciness.  This act of hubris meant that I forgot the crucial step of scoring the top of the scone into sections and as it contains raising agent, I decided to leave it to bake undisturbed and cut it into sections when fresh. (The Vintage Cookbook Trials: Cocking things up so you don’t have to).

Results


There’s a slight problem here.  I don’t like scones with sugar in them.  I didn’t know this when I started, but I do now. There’s nothing wrong with the recipe – as long as you go slow with the milk and  make two small rounds and score each into four or use a cutter, as the resulting  1/6 scones were absolutely huge – coffee-shop cake-slice size. So, a good recipe, but not one I personally will be repeating.

Thanks again to classy broad Ms Loose Canon for the strawberry and plum jam.

Wholed by Elly

Wholemeal Scones
Yet another recipe I’m attempting because one of the key ingredients is something I have in the cupboard with ‘best before 2 months ago’ printed on the top of the pack, and further, as regular readers will know I love [bacon parsley]  scones [cheese].Notes
Add the milk little by little, mixing thoroughly, because I sloshed in the last few mils and the dough ended up very sticky and had to be mixed by hand in the bowl, rather than kneaded.
When I had wrestled it on to the baking tray and patted it into shaped (see above), I decided to sprinkle some oats on top for extra rustic fanciness.  This act of hubris meant that I forgot the crucial step of scoring the top of the scone into sections and as it contains raising agent, I decided to leave it to bake undisturbed and cut it into sections when fresh. (The Vintage Cookbook Trials: Cocking things up so you don’t have to).

Results
There’s a slight problem here.  I don’t like scones with sugar in them.  I didn’t know this when I started, but I do now. There’s nothing wrong with the recipe – as long as you go slow with the milk and  make two small rounds and score each into four or use a cutter, as the resulting  1/6 scones were absolutely huge – coffee-shop cake-slice size. So, a good recipe, but not one I personally will be repeating.

Thanks again to classy broad Loose Canon for the strawberry and plum jam.Wholemeal Scones
Yet another recipe I’m attempting because one of the key ingredients is something I have in the cupboard with ‘best before 2 months ago’ printed on the top of the pack, and further, as regular readers will know I love [bacon parsley]  scones [cheese].

Notes
Add the milk little by little, mixing thoroughly, because I sloshed in the last few mils and the dough ended up very sticky and had to be mixed by hand in the bowl, rather than kneaded.
When I had wrestled it on to the baking tray and patted it into shaped (see above), I decided to sprinkle some oats on top for extra rustic fanciness.  This act of hubris meant that I forgot the crucial step of scoring the top of the scone into sections and as it contains raising agent, I decided to leave it to bake undisturbed and cut it into sections when fresh. (The Vintage Cookbook Trials: Cocking things up so you don’t have to).

Results
There’s a slight problem here.  I don’t like scones with sugar in them.  I didn’t know this when I started, but I do now. There’s nothing wrong with the recipe – as long as you go slow with the milk and  make two small rounds and score each into four or use a cutter, as the resulting  1/6 scones were absolutely huge – coffee-shop cake-slice size. So, a good recipe, but not one I personally will be repeating.

Thanks again to classy broad Loose Canon for the strawberry and plum jam.Wholemeal Scones
Yet another recipe I’m attempting because one of the key ingredients is something I have in the cupboard with ‘best before 2 months ago’ printed on the top of the pack, and further, as regular readers will know I love [bacon parsley]  scones [cheese].

Notes
Add the milk little by little, mixing thoroughly, because I sloshed in the last few mils and the dough ended up very sticky and had to be mixed by hand in the bowl, rather than kneaded.
When I had wrestled it on to the baking tray and patted it into shaped (see above), I decided to sprinkle some oats on top for extra rustic fanciness.  This act of hubris meant that I forgot the crucial step of scoring the top of the scone into sections and as it contains raising agent, I decided to leave it to bake undisturbed and cut it into sections when fresh. (The Vintage Cookbook Trials: Cocking things up so you don’t have to).

Results
There’s a slight problem here.  I don’t like scones with sugar in them.  I didn’t know this when I started, but I do now. There’s nothing wrong with the recipe – as long as you go slow with the milk and  make two small rounds and score each into four or use a cutter, as the resulting  1/6 scones were absolutely huge – coffee-shop cake-slice size. So, a good recipe, but not one I personally will be repeating.

Thanks again to classy broad Loose Canon for the strawberry and plum jam.Wholemeal Scones
Yet another recipe I’m attempting because one of the key ingredients is something I have in the cupboard with ‘best before 2 months ago’ printed on the top of the pack, and further, as regular readers will know I love [bacon parsley]  scones [cheese].

Notes
Add the milk little by little, mixing thoroughly, because I sloshed in the last few mils and the dough ended up very sticky and had to be mixed by hand in the bowl, rather than kneaded.
When I had wrestled it on to the baking tray and patted it into shaped (see above), I decided to sprinkle some oats on top for extra rustic fanciness.  This act of hubris meant that I forgot the crucial step of scoring the top of the scone into sections and as it contains raising agent, I decided to leave it to bake undisturbed and cut it into sections when fresh. (The Vintage Cookbook Trials: Cocking things up so you don’t have to).

Results
There’s a slight problem here.  I don’t like scones with sugar in them.  I didn’t know this when I started, but I do now. There’s nothing wrong with the recipe – as long as you go slow with the milk and  make two small rounds and score each into four or use a cutter, as the resulting  1/6 scones were absolutely huge – coffee-shop cake-slice size. So, a good recipe, but not one I personally will be repeating.

Thanks again to classy broad Loose Canon for the strawberry and plum jam.

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2 responses to “Wholemeal scones

  1. They do look particularly appetising though. I usually find wholemeal scones look too wholesome for my liking!

  2. You made me lol. Emergency baking with out of date stuff. We’ve all been there.