Potage au Potiron – Pumpkin Soup

My usual method of making pumpkin (or squash soup) is to roast chunks of pumpkin and onion with olive oil and chilli and liquidise them with some stock. Today I thought I might try something different. It’s been a while since I cooked anything from Jane Grigson’s Vegetable Book (Penguin, 1978) but the last soup I made from this book was more than serviceable.

Recipe
Cook slowly in butter the white part of  two or three leeks, a large onion chopped and a couple of small turnips, diced.  Add the cubed flesh of a 1kg slice of pumpkin and cook for ten minutes longer. Moisten with 2litres (3½ pints) of stock or water and season. Simmer for 45 minutes, then sieve through a moulie-legumes. Correct the seasoning, add a pinch of sugar and a ladleful of cream.

Notes

  • I made half the quantity
  • I don’t own a food mill (mouli-legumes) so used a sieve instead.
  • I used chicken stock – I think water would produce a very bland final product.
  • I’ve never cooked with turnips before!

Results


This is a very pleasant, very easy soup. The peppery-ness of the turnips and leeks prevents the pumpkin from being cloyingly sweet. For variation, or if you like strong flavours, you could add a little rosemary or sage  while cooking the leeks.

Potironed by Elly

Potage au Potiron – Pumpkin soup
I have a trusted source of home-grown pumpkins and squash in the autumn and winter months (HI MUM!!!) and today thought I might try a pumpkin soup that not just my usual method of roasting chunks of pumpkin and onion with olive oil and chilli and liquidising them with some stock. It’s been a while since I cooked anything from Jane Grigson’s Vegetable Book (Penguin, 1976).Recipe
Cook slowly in butter the white part of  two or three leeks, a large onion chopped and a couple of small turnips, diced.  Add the cubed flesh of a 1kg slice of pumpkin and cook for ten minutes longer. Moisten with 2litres (3½ pints) of stock or water and season. Simmer for 45minutes, then sieve through a moulie-legumes. Correct the seasoning, add a pinch of sugar and a ladleful of cream.

Notes
I made half the quantity
I don’t own a food mill (mouli-legumes) so used a stick blender instead.
I used chicken stock – I think water would produce a very bland product.

Results
This is a very pleasant, very easy soup. For variation, or if you like strong flavours, you could add a little rosemary, sage or paprika while cooking the leeks.
Potage au Potiron – Pumpkin soup
I have a trusted source of home-grown pumpkins and squash in the autumn and winter months (HI MUM!!!) and today thought I might try a pumpkin soup that not just my usual method of roasting chunks of pumpkin and onion with olive oil and chilli and liquidising them with some stock. It’s been a while since I cooked anything from Jane Grigson’s Vegetable Book (Penguin, 1976).

Recipe
Cook slowly in butter the white part of  two or three leeks, a large onion chopped and a couple of small turnips, diced.  Add the cubed flesh of a 1kg slice of pumpkin and cook for ten minutes longer. Moisten with 2litres (3½ pints) of stock or water and season. Simmer for 45minutes, then sieve through a moulie-legumes. Correct the seasoning, add a pinch of sugar and a ladleful of cream.

Notes
I made half the quantity
I don’t own a food mill (mouli-legumes) so used a stick blender instead.
I used chicken stock – I think water would produce a very bland product.

Results
This is a very pleasant, very easy soup. For variation, or if you like strong flavours, you could add a little rosemary, sage or paprika while cooking the leeks.

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5 responses to “Potage au Potiron – Pumpkin Soup

  1. Oooh, I like the turnip tip. I like pumpkins and sweet potatoes, but find them too sweet in a soup and I have never worked out what to do with those wee purple turnips. Problem solved!

  2. Mmmm yum. Looks good.

  3. I’m mainly admiring your stylish crockery. But the soup sounds great, too.

  4. Looks lovely. I’m not sure I’ve cooked with turnips either, apart from in a Dan Lepard Ginger Root Cake. I’m bit put off after the pork and turnip dish I had at Gourmet San once that had distinct undertones of wee.

  5. Turnips are in the cabbage family, the undertones were more likely the pork. Who knows what the little piggies are fed these days – fish meal, some say.