Category Archives: John Kirkham

The Bakers’ ABC: R is for Rissole

A mixture of cooked meat, chopped fine, and bound together with potatoes, breadcrumb and egg, or other binding material spiced and reheated. Usually shaped round or oval, and rolled in breadcrumb before cooking. Certain shapes, formed like rib chops, and with a piece of macaroni in each to represent the bone  are designated cutlets; thus chicken cutlets, fish cutlets, &c.

[ I couldn’t make this up if I tried.]

From The Baker’s ABC by John Kirkland, formerly Head Teacher of National School of Baking, published 1927 by Gresham

The Bakers’ ABC: Q is for Quantivalency

A term applied by Hoffmann in 1865 to indicate a certain capacity of elements, and compound radicles, for entering into combination with other elements. The term valency is now used to denote such capacity or valency.

From The Baker’s ABC by John Kirkland, formerly Head Teacher of National School of Baking, published 1927 by Gresham

The bakers’ ABC: O is for Oyster Patties

Made of puff-paste in the form of small vol-au-vents or tartlets. The “oyster meat” is made of a thickened sauce made with milk and the liquor of the oyster, and it flavoured with salt, cayenne pepper, lemon juice &c. A little butter or cream is used for best quality. The oysters, cut into small cubes, are stirred into the paste and the whole mixture boiled. The “oyster meat” is filled into the cases when cold and set, and a small round of white puff paste set in the centre of each patty.

From The Baker’s ABC by John Kirkland, formerly Head Teacher of National School of Baking, published 1927 by Gresham

The Bakers’ ABC: N is for Neat’s foot oil

An oil obtained by boiling down the hooves of calves and sheep.  It is soluble in hot alcohol and ether. Used principally as a lubricant and for leather-dressing. This oil is not liable to change or become rancid. It remains liquid at below 32F.

From The Baker’s ABC by John Kirkland, formerly Head Teacher of National School of Baking, published 1927 by Gresham

The Bakers’ ABC: M is for Maslin

The name applied to a mixture of grain, or to a meal or flour made of such a mixture. The grains commonly mixed are wheat and rye, or wheat and barley. The two sorts are sometimes grown together in the same field, reaped together, and ground into meal together. The mashlin, mashlum, or mashlie was used in Scotland in the same way. Mashlum scones were in the regular diet, in the bread line of farm workers some sixty years ago.

From The Baker’s ABC by John Kirkland, formerly Head Teacher of National School of Baking, published 1927 by Gresham

The Bakers’ ABC: L is for Label or Lip Roll

A small Vienna roll, lip-shaped. The pieces are moulded round, hen creased in centre with the side of the hand, or a thin rolling pin; proved on a cloth, crease downwards, and baked with the crease side upwards.

From The Baker’s ABC by John Kirkland, formerly Head Teacher of National School of Baking, published 1927 by Gresham

The Bakers’ ABC: K is for Knife and Rider

This is the name of an old-time appliance, used in bread bakeries, for cleaning the tables at the end of a day’s work. If tables used for bread dough handling are washed, there is a danger of swelling the wood, particularly if it is soft, and raising the “reed” or fibres. The “knife and rider” cleans the tables perfectly, without washing, and keeps them smooth and free from splinters. The apparatus consists of any old knife, with the handle cut off, but with its sharp side straight.

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